18 January 2010

Figure Drawing - Fall 2009





A few recent figure drawings. The top drawing was done at home in 2 hours from a photo. The other drawings were from a life-drawing class taught by Erik Gist, also done in 2 hours. Aside from model vs. photo, the main difference was that at home I was able to step back from the easel and take a good hard look at the reference photo and the drawing. I caught drawing inaccuracies earlier, saving more time for the finish. It's hard to step away from a drawing when you have a limited time with a live model, but it may produce a better result. I'm going to give it a try next life drawing class.

I recently watched Morgan Weistling's newest instructional DVD called "Painting for the Impatient". One of the points made was how over-modeling can ruin the illusion of form in a painting (or drawing). Over-modeling here simply means using an excessive number of values, making the form look lumpy and distorted. After I mapped in the general shapes in the first drawing above, the image looked busy and unconvincing. I knocked down the value range with a light charcoal glazing over the entire figure, then went back in and picked out light areas selectively with a kneaded eraser. The effect was to unify the overall form. Something to try if your figure looks like a group of disconnected shapes, rather than a single unified form.

The photo reference for the first drawing came from a book called Art Models:Life Nude Photos for the Visual Arts 2, which comes with a CD containing high definition images of all the poses in the book. There are 4 books in the series. At the publisher's website you can also download a variety of individual poses. Much cheaper than hiring a model for a photo shoot.

Final note: The images above were drawn in 2 hours with a Conte Pierre Noire 1710 B charcoal pencil on 24 x 18 smooth newsprint. Erik worked up the torso areas on the 2nd and 4th drawings, and the model's foreshortened right arm/hand on the third drawing.

23 comments:

  1. Candace, these look great! I myself very much miss the luxury of drawing from live models.

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  2. These look amazing! The drawing of the woman is really excellent.

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  3. Candance, hello, hope you've been well. I love figure drawing so much, and I adore Weistling, and the Mrs. Weistling, they are faves. And as always I enjoy your blog and your work. Best wishes.

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  4. Great work as always Candace.

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  5. All are beautiful drawings! And your words of advice are really helpful !

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  6. Absolutely amazing....you're very talented!

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  7. These are wonderful Candace, you have a real connection with the models to draw them so touchingly.

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  8. Excellent work, and always my thanks for tips and technical references you provide. You bring it al together and explain it all eloquently. Regards.

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  9. Daniel, Drawing from life is my favorite class, even though other efforts produce much more finished work. Just something very immediate and honest about it. Thanks for your visit, and my sincere compliments on your portraits. Best.

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  10. Kelley, Wasn't sure how that drawing was going to come out, but she was a very skilled model, which comes through in the image.

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  11. Hey, Tina. Thanks and I agree on Weistling. Great video if you're interested. I stopped by your blog recently. Love the figures you posted, but wasn't able to leave a comment. Thanks for your frequent encouragement. C

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  12. James, I always appreciate seeing signs of your visits. I've been posting for a year now, and I think you were one of my first follows. All the best to you this year, and I look forward to seeing where your art heads. Best.

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  13. Monico, Thanks for visiting. Great work on your blog, very expressive, distinct style. Something many of us work years to acquire. Love the unicorn in hell. Nice.

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  14. Amanda, Much appreciated coming from you. Thanks for the boost. Best.

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  15. Candace, all 4 of these are so well done. You are amazing! My fave is the young man facing left. Incredible shadows! Love the way you always zoom in on the most interesting details and shadows, then leave other areas to the imagination.

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  16. Hi Candace, I am so glad you have found my blog, now I can see your beautiful drawings and paintings. Thank you for your comment I really appreciate it, especially from a caliber artist as yourself. I love your studies and paintings, I'm excited to see more! Thanks again.

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  17. Hello Candace,
    Your work with the figure is very impressive. I look forward to seeing more.

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  18. Great works! Congratulations!

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  19. Your talent continues to amaze me, Candace. These are just wonderful figure studies.

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  20. Hi, Candace, I am back, I was checking to see if you had new work since my comment above. Hope you are well, and I am glad to know I am not the only one (about the brushes!)

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  21. Hi Candace!.... Found your wonderful site by chance! I admire (and envy) your beautiful charcoal drawings... and particularly the rich... vibrant Zorn exercises! What a master he was! What a wonderful experience you are enjoying in this atelier regimen!

    I will certainly spend more time in depth reading your posts thoroughly... and I certainly will become an ardent follower!A truly entertaining and educational offering! Thank "You"!

    Good painting!
    Bruce Sherman

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  22. The first figure is especially strong, Candace.

    I like how the male is pulling on the fabric. You can almost feel the stretch of it!

    Great job on all of these!

    -Dean

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