03 March 2012

On Portrait Vignette #7 and Pietro Annigoni


Today's portrait subject is Ryan, younger brother of Taylor.  Both portraits were painted from photos.  A cool aspect of these portraits is that the brothers photographed each other.  They look at you, the viewer, but also at each other.  I hope, in years to come, they look at these portraits and remember that moment.  Unlike the reference photos, these paintings will endure.


Ryan in Suspension, 16 x 12", Oil on linen


Below is the progression, click to enlarge.  If you follow this blog, you've seen enough of these to know how it goes.  If you are new here, see earlier progressions with step-by-step explanations here, here, and here.


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Regarding artistic inspiration...

I'm always interested to know about artist's inspirations.  Referral to favorite artworks is a time-honored method of learning and artistic problem-solving.  Standing on the shoulders of giants.  I always have images clipped on my easel for inspiration.  A year ago, they were often by Zorn, Sargent, Sorolla, or Rembrandt.  At the moment, they tend towards Serov, Repin, Velasquez, and Annigoni.

For "Ryan in Suspension", inspiration came from "Mr. Rydy" by the Florentine artist, Pietro Annigoni.  My work pales by comparison, but that's motivating.  I intend to paint some upcoming portraits in this general direction.


Mr. Rydy, size unknown, oil on canvas, circa 1950.

Annigoni nurtured the traditions of classical realism in Italy during a time when realism was considered passé.  Of course, many appreciated his gifts, and he produced numerous and powerful portraits, as part of his very extensive body of work.

Below is another of his distinct, psychological portraits.  Beautiful draftsmanship. There is a surprising lack of printed material on Annigoni's work.  The painting below is from a large-format Chinese book on his portraits, which I purchased from Gallery Nucleus.  The print quality in this book is good, and it's reasonably priced. To view more of Annigoni's works, visit ArtRenewal.com, MuseumSyndicate.com or Gandy Gallery.  Enjoy.


Portrait of a Woman, oil on canvas, 20x16", 1951

10 comments:

  1. Your portrait look amazing, but I must thank you for the info on Annigoni. I had never heard of him but your examples strike me. I am definitely looking him up!!

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  2. Sophie, I'm happy to introduce a receptive artist to Pietro Annigoni. I'm always transfixed by his portraiture. Enjoy, and thanks for your comments.

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  3. I'm looking forward seeing your next paintings Candace. Seeing the step by step painting of each portrait amuses me!

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  4. Greetings, Grace. I agree, it's fun to see a step-by-step of a full portrait. It's instructive and somehow appears instantly before your eyes. I'm always willing to show my secrets, because I know the hard part is in the doing, not in the seeing. Thanks for your comments. Best, Candace.

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  5. Sorry, I don,t speake english very good. Let me say you work is marvellous. See you.

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    1. Fernando, Comprender claramente el mensaje y le agradezco sus esfuerzos para comunicarse. Gracias por sus amables comentarios. Saludos cordiales.

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  6. Lovely portrait! I particularly enjoy seeing your in-progress photos too. Can't wait to see the next one!

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    1. Jeremy, Thanks for your nice comments. It's settled then, I'll do more progressions. Best, Candace.

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  7. Another awesome job! Inspiring, I now want to paint.

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    1. Hi, Daniel. I love seeing a painting that makes me want to paint. Great feeling. That's a nice complement. TY.

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